Referee Certification, Re-Certification and Upgrading Requirements

Referee Certification, Re-Certification and Upgrading Requirements

U.S. Soccer has redefined various roles such as Referee Grade, Instructor Grade, etc. and the Certification, Recertification and as appropriate - Upgrade requirements for these roles. In some roles / grades the State Referee Committee can implement requirements in excess of those set as minimums by U.S. Soccer. Additionally, in the area of Training, the State Referee Committee can always have higher requirements than those from U.S. Soccer.

All referee clinics are listed on the WASRC Available Clinics site. Please visit this site to look up referee clinics for new referees as well as recertification clinics for existing referees. All the clinics listed on this site will work for refereeing games in WA state.

We recommend that new referees try to attend the clinics right before the spring season (starts early April) and fall season (starts early Sept), so you can get ready and hit the ground running. New referees should expect to ref U8-U10 games at the beginning to get used to controlling a game, and we try to mentor as much as possible.

Please note:

  • Badge Year - US Soccer defines a Badge Year as running from January 1 thru December 31; that is - the year on the Badge. A registered Referee can use that Badge to be assigned USSF games during that calendar year.
  • Registration / Recertification "Year" - The registration period for a given Badge Year is offset by 6 months ahead, running between July 1 and June 30.
  • Training taken after July 1st of a given year will be good that fall as well as the whole following year; ie, if you take a clinic in August of 2018, it will be good for fall of 2018 as well as all of 2019.
  • All referees must go to a clinic, complete online modules and pay for a badge every year.

Please note: Events not sponsored or formally sanctioned by the State Referee Committee will not be considered as contributing to the Certification, Recertification and Upgrade process. No exceptions to this policy will be considered.

To learn more about the current referee minimum requirements, please visit the Washington State Referee Committee website.

 
I am Developing - I am WA Youth Soccer
 
View the WSSC Policies Page for information concerning reimbursement for referee training.




New Referee Training

Your young son and daughter decided last year to follow your advice and play soccer. The year started very well, but as it wore on, you determined that the referees should be doing a better job. Most of them were doing fine, but perhaps the thought crossed your mind that you could do a better job. And did you wonder how you might go about this for the coming season? For persons wishing to referee for the first time, we have some choices: Read More Here

 
Advice to Referees Video Series

Advice to New Referees Videos

U.S. Soccer’s Advice to New Referees focuses on how to prepare for and deal with the everyday challenges of being an official and provides practical advice that empowers new referees to succeed and have fun. The class you took taught you about the Laws of the Game but there is still a lot to learn in order to succeed as a referee. This information has been put together based on feedback from thousands of new referees just like you and with help from experienced referees who started out where you are now.  NOTE:  This page may take several seconds to load because of the links to the videos.

Read more...


 
Referee Code of Ethics

Referees Code of Ethics:

A code of ethics has been developed for all Referees by US Youth Soccer & USSF to clarify and distinguish approved and accepted behavior.

  • I will always maintain the utmost respect for the game of soccer.
  • I will conduct myself honorably at all times and maintain the dignity of my position.
  • I will always honor an assignment or any other contractual obligation.
  • I will attend training meetings and clinics so as to know the Laws of the Game, their proper interpretation and their application.
  • I will always strive to achieve maximum teamwork with any fellow officials.
  • I will be loyal to my fellow officials and never knowingly promote criticism of them.
  • I will be in good physical condition.
  • I will control the players effectively by being courteous and considerate without sacrificing fairness.
  • I will do my utmost to assist my fellow officials to better themselves and their work.
  • I will not make statements about any games except to clarify an interpretation of the Laws of the Game.
  • I will not discriminate against nor take undue advantage of any individual group on the basis of race, color, religion, sex or national origin.
  • I consider it a privilege to be a part of the United States Soccer Federation and my actions will reflect credit upon that organization and its affiliates.
 
Become a Referee by Brendan Moore
Posted Apr 6, 2014

We asked one of our outstanding youth referees, Brendan Moore,  to share a few thoughts about becomming a referee.

I first got into reffing last spring when I learned that I needed to earn money for a school trip. I’ve played rec soccer since I was in first grade, and I enjoy the game, so this job was a natural choice for me. The weekend class wasn’t difficult, and I was thrilled to earn my badge. My Dad saw so many games without refs last fall, so he decided to take the class, and we will both be reffing with WSSC this spring.

I was a bit afraid I’d make a mistake at my first game, but it went well. There is a lot to keep track of however, and at my third game I forgot to set the timer, and I ended the first half too early. The coaches were friendly and asked me if there was a problem. I apologized, and we played a longer second half. It was a learning experience, and I’m pretty sure I won’t make that mistake again.

I would recommend becoming a referee to other kids for lots of reasons. First, you can earn good money. I don’t know of any other job available to kids my age that pays as well. Second, it’s pretty cool to tell your friends that you ref. Third, it can be a little intimidating with two sidelines full of fans, but the referee gets the responsibility for calling the game as fairly as possible. Finally, I have a new appreciation for refs and how difficult it can be to call a game, both when I play and also in the MLS.


 
Know The Rules

Review rules of the game, including modified soccer (U6-U12).


 

TriasSoccerCentral is a not for profit organization dedicated to the education, professional support, service, and assignment of soccer referees, with specific focus on providing service to our sponsoring Associations (GRTYSA and Highline). Our goal is to assist all referees to grow in their pursuit of excellence in the officiating profession. We are an equal opportunity organization, encouraging the young, the minority, the new, and the experienced soccer referee.


 
Washington State Referee Committee

The Washington State Referee Committee is the official USSF affiliated soccer referee organization for the state of Washington and are responsible for the administration of the USSF National Program for Referee development, including Registration,Instruction, Mentoring and Assessment within the State of Washington in the northwest corner of the continental United States.


 
US Soccer Referee Resources
 
Ask The Referee